An equitable CALL / SLA interface

faceless schoolchildren watching video on cellphone during break in classroom
Photo by Katerina Holmes on Pexels.com

From Ortega, L. (2017) New CALL-SLA Research Interfaces for the 21st Century: Towards Equitable Multilingualism. Calico Journal, 34.3, 285–316.

The majority of the world is multilingual, but inequitably multilingual, and much of the world is also technologized, but inequitably so. Thus, researchers in the fields of computer-assisted language learning (CALL) and second language acquisition (SLA) would profit from considering multilingualism and social justice when envisioning new CALL-SLA interfaces for the future. 

I remain convinced that “in the ultimate analysis, it is not the methods or the epistemologies [or the theories] that justify the legitimacy and quality of human research, but the moral-political purposes that guide sustained research efforts” (Ortega, 2005, p. 438). The need to incorporate ethics and axiology in the study of language learning seems all the more acute in our present world, where human solidarity and respect for human diversity, including linguistic diversity, is under siege, creating serious vulnerabilities for the goal of multilingualism and the lives of many multilinguals. Echoingbut also widening Chun’s (2016) call for an ecological CALL in the post-2000s era, the overarching question that I have submitted to orient CALL–SLA research interfaces for the 21st century is: What technologies, teaching paradigms, views of language, and principal uses of computers can nurture multilingualism and digital literacies for all, not just for the privileged?

Aprendizaje de lenguas mediante dispositivos móviles: alcance, praxis y teoría

Conferencia plenaria, 25 de noviembre 2020,; XXI Congreso SEDLL Multimodalidad y nuevos entornos de aprendizaje en la enseñanza de las lenguas y las literaturas.

3 case studies

Pérez-Paredes, P., Ordoñana Guillamón, C., Van de Vyver, J., Meurice, A., Aguado Jiménez, P., Conole, G., & Sánchez Hernández, P. (2019). Mobile data-driven language learning: Affordances and learners’ perception. System, 84, 145–159.

Zhang, D., & Pérez-Paredes, P. (2019). Chinese postgraduate EFL learners’ self-directed use of mobile English learning resources. Computer Assisted Language Learning.  

Zhang, D. & Pérez-Paredes, P. (2020). Exploring Chinese EFL teachers’ perceptions of Augmented Reality (AR) in English language learning. In Miller, L. & Wu, G. (eds) Language Learning with Technology: theories, principles and practices. Springer.

Keynote abstract

Mobile assisted language learning (MALL) has become one the most popular keywords in computer assisted language learning (CALL) research over the last twenty years. While MALL enthusiasts have glossed its many affordances, the use of MALL in instructed classroom settings presents challenges of their own (Kukulska-Hulme & Shield, 2008; Conole & Pérez-Paredes, 2017; Pérez-Paredes, Ordoñana Guillamón, & Aguado Jiménez, 2018) that, I argue, have not been successfully defined in CALL research and classroom settings.

Traxler (2009) has noted that mobile learning is uniquely placed to support learning that is personalized, authentic, and situated. However, some relevant studies have thrown cold water on these expectations (Golonka, E. et al., 2014; Grgurović, Chapelle & Shelley, 2013). In this plenary, I will discuss different conceptualizations of MALL that emphasize areas of language learning that are anchored on different theories of language learning. I will use three case studies that have used different research methodologies, namely survey and mixed methods, across different contexts, countries and types of learning. I will discuss the self-directed uses of MALL (Zhang  & Pérez-Paredes, 2019), the design and use of apps to promote the acquisition of frequency-related declarative knowledge (Pérez-Paredes et al., 2019)  and the impact of new technologies such as Augmented Reality (AR) on language classrooms  (Zhang  & Pérez-Paredes, 2020). Ultimately, I will discuss a conceptual framework that situates MALL more critically in the context of existing and future practices of instructed (Foster, 2019; Kaminski, 2019) and self-directed (Trinder, 2017) language learning. Keywords: MALL, language learning, self-directed language learning, second language learning theory

References

Conole, G. & Pérez-Paredes, P. (2017). Adult language learning in informal settings and the role of mobile learning. Mobile and ubiquitous learning. An international handbook. New York: Springer, pp.45-58.

Foster, I. (2019) The future of language learning. Language, Culture and Curriculum, 32,3, 261-269,

Golonka, E. et al. (2014). Technologies for foreign language learning: a review of technology types and their effectiveness”. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 27.1, 70-105.

Grgurović, M. Chapelle, C.  & Shelley, M.  (2013). A meta-analysis of effectiveness studies on computer technology-supported language learning. ReCALL, 25, pp 165-198.

Kaminski, A. (2019). Young learners’ engagement with multimodal texts. ELT Journal, 73(2), 175–185.

Kukulska-Hulme, A. & Shield, L. (2008). An overview of mobile assisted language learning: From content delivery to supported collaboration and interaction. ReCALL, 20, pp 271-289.

Pérez-Paredes, P., Ordoñana Guillamón, C., & Aguado Jiménez, P. (2018). Language teachers’ perceptions on the use of OER language processing technologies in MALL. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 31(5-6), 522-545.

Pérez-Paredes, P., Ordoñana Guillamón, C., Van de Vyver, J., Meurice, A., Aguado Jiménez, P., Conole, G., & Sánchez Hernández, P. (2019). Mobile data-driven language learning: Affordances and learners’ perception. System, 84, 145–159.

Zhang, D., & Pérez-Paredes, P. (2019). Chinese postgraduate EFL learners’ self-directed use of mobile English learning resources. Computer Assisted Language Learning.  

Zhang, D. & Pérez-Paredes, P. (2020). Exploring Chinese EFL teachers’ perceptions of Augmented Reality (AR) in English language learning. In Miller, L. & Wu, G. (eds) Language Learning with Technology: theories, principles and practices. Springer.

TELL-OP products and reports available here.

Traxler, J. (2009). Current state of mobile learning. In Ally, M. (ed.) Mobile learning: Transforming the delivery of education and training. Athabasca University Press, 9-24.

Traxler, J. (2018). Learning with Mobiles in the Digital Age. Pedagogika, Special Monothematic Issue: Education Futures for the Digital Age: Theory and Practice

Traxler, J.; Timothy, R.; Kukulska-Hulme, A. & Barcena, E. (2019). Paradoxical paradigm proposals – Learning languages in mobile societies. Argentinian Journal of Applied Linguistics (AJAL), 7(2) pp. 89–109.

Trinder, R. (2017). Informal and deliberate learning with new technologies. ELT Journal, 71(4), 401–412.

Wegerif, R. (2007). Dialogic education and technology: Expanding the space of learning (Vol. 7). Springer Science & Business Media.

#CFP Symposium on Learning Analytics in Language Learning & Teaching

From the EUROCALL mail-list

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Symposium on Learning Analytics in Language Learning and Teaching – Call for Papers

Arising from participation in the EU-funded VITAL project (http://project-vital.eu/) the University of Central Lancashire is hosting a one-day symposium on Learning Analytics in Language Learning and Teaching on 17th July 2017 in Preston. The keynote speakers include Professor Jozef Colpaert (University of Antwerp, Belgium) and Professor Bart Rienties (Open University, UK)

 Abstract submission guidelines

Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words and submitted as a word attachment to the conference email address (mthomas4@uclan.ac.uk). The submission email should contain the participant’s name, affiliation and biography (50 to 100 words). The deadline is 22nd May April 2017. All submissions will be blind peer-reviewed. Accepted abstracts will be allotted 20 minutes for presentations.

Further information on the symposium is available here:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/learning-analytics-in-language-learning-and-teaching-tickets-33850975178

 

Key dates

Abstract submission: 22nd May 2017

Notification to presenters: 5th June 2017

Conference: 17th July 2017

Publication guidelines

Presenters will also be invited to submit their papers for publication in a special edition of the peer-reviewed Journal of Second Language Teaching and Research.

Conference Address

Scholars Suite, School of Language and Global Studies, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE.

 Participant Registration

Please register as a conference participant by following the link below. This event is free and light refreshments will be provided:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/learning-analytics-in-language-learning-and-teaching-tickets-33850975178 

The VITAL project has been funded with support from the European Commission (Project number: 2015-BE02-KA203-012317).

 

@CALICOnsortium conference 2017 Multilingualism and Digital Literacies NAU May 16-20

 

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CALICO 2017 34th ANNUAL CONFERENCE Multilingualism and Digital Literacies

Northern Arizona University
May 16-20
DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: OCTOBER 31, 2016
Workshops: Tuesday, May 16 – Wednesday, May 17, and Saturday, May 20
Opening Reception and Keynote: Wednesday, May 17
Presentation Sessions: Thursday, May 18 and Friday, May 19
Technology Showcase and Poster Session: Thursday, May 18

https://calico.org/page.php?id=690

CALICO is a professional organization whose members research the informed and innovative uses of technology in foreign/second language learning and teaching. CALICO’s conferences bring together educators, administrators, materials developers, researchers, government representatives, vendors of hardware and software, and others interested in the field of computer-assisted language learning. Proposals may explore the conference theme or address any area of technology pertaining to language learning and teaching. Presentations may be in either traditional or practitioner research styles, grounded in theory and/or methodology, covering topics in language acquisition and integration of software and technology into the learning environment. A formal paper need not accompany a presentation at the conference. However, presenters are encouraged to submit a formal paper for review to the CALICO Journal, on the same topic (or any other).
The proposal and its guidelines will require the following information: title, type of presentation, 100-word abstract, 300-word description, presenter/co-presenter contact information, and technology needs.
Five types of presentation formats are available:
Workshop (pre- or post-conference, hands-on; half-day, full-day or two-day presenter’s choice)
Technology Showcase (a two-hour informal event during one evening of the conference)
Poster Session (in conjunction with the Showcase)
Presentation (30-minute individual presentation)
Panel discussion (90-minute regular presentation designed for multiple presentations and presenters on a specific topic)

SACODEYL corpora #corpuslinguistics in The Routledge Handbook of Language Learning and Technology

 

routledgeHandbook

 

Corpus types and uses
B Murphy, E Riordan – The Routledge Handbook of Language Learning and …, 2016
… 2008). Another is the SACODEYL corpus, which includes transcribed interviews with
British, German, French, Italian Spanish, Lithuanian and Romanian adolescents
between 13 and 18 years of age (Hoffstaedter and Kohn 2009). …

The Routledge Handbook of Language Learning and Technology
F Farr, L Murray – 2016
… Page 19. Acronyms OLPC OMC OPUS PC PLE PLN RPG RSS SACODEYL SBCSAE SCMC
SEN SLA SOLE SSI Model TEC TESOL TNC VLE VOICE VSL WiA WoW ZPD one laptop per
child Oslo Multilingual Corpus Open Parallel Corpus personal computer personal learning …

Spoken language corpora and pedagogical applications
A Caines, M McCarthy, A O’Keeffe – The Routledge Handbook of Language Learning …, 2016
… Focusing on an innovative tool developed to make corpus use easier to access for language
teaching, Farr (2010) details the potential of the SACODEYL (System Aided Compilation and
Open Distribution of European Youth Language, a European Commission–funded project …

Written language corpora and pedagogical applications
A Chambers – The Routledge Handbook of Language Learning and …, 2016
… 241–245), based on Mur Dueñas (2009), while the other focuses on intermediate learners of
EAP (pp. 260–263), based on Boulton (2010). Notes 1 http://www. um. es/sacodeyl (accessed
27 June 2014). 2 http://www. um. es/backbone (accessed 27 June 2014). 3 http://www. …